Throwback Thursday: 10th grade Symbolism in V for Vendetta

Every once in a while, on a Thursday, I post an old school assignment that I have written as a “throwback thursday” type thing when I have an assignment I’ve found that seems interesting enough to post. This time, I have my essay on the roses in V for Vendetta as a symbol from tenth grade.

 

“They have eradicated culture…tossed it away like a fistful of dead roses” p.18

 

This is one of the first things V says to Evey. It’s important because it’s the first line we get that clearly shows his indignation with the world, and also the start of his education of Evey, in telling her all of the culture that was erased by the government he is trying to change, and later, get her to help him change. This line is also an important piece of foreshadowing because it is the first time V speaks of roses. Roses play an important part in V for Vendetta, V grows roses while at Larkhill, V gives roses to people whose deaths are carefully planned – such as Delia and the priest -, V also guides Rosemary – a different type of rose – into killing the leader. He speaks off dead roses, and he uses roses as a symbol for someone’s death. Giving them a rose means he is going to kill them, such as when he tells Evey, much later, to pick a rose to give the man who killed her Gordon. We learn that the roses have gone extinct, or at least nearly so, while reading Delia’s diary. The roses are dead. V says the culture is “tossed away like a fistful of dead roses”, so he tosses away the people who thinks are the worst of the society, of the government, the ones who worked at Larkhill with the dead roses. The roses die by consequence of their actins and they die too. V’s line “They have eradicated culture…tossed it away like a fistful of dead roses is important, because it is the first mention of the roses, which are important all throughout the novel.

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