discussion, fandoms, movies/tv, review, throwback thursday

“No doubt; endings are hard”: Fan Reactions to Supernatural’s Finale and the End of the “Last Great American Queerbait”

The title cards for each of the fifteen seasons of Supernatural. Supernatural is an American Horror-Drama series created by Eric Kripke, which originally aired in 2005 on The WB channel, and was later moved to The CW channel from seasons two to fifteen, which finished airing in 2020. Supernatural is considered the longest running American… Continue reading “No doubt; endings are hard”: Fan Reactions to Supernatural’s Finale and the End of the “Last Great American Queerbait”

books, throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: The Eye of the Storm: Safe Spaces and the Reframing of Mental Illness in Ellen Forney’s Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, & Me

Mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder have a reputation for being frightening, to both patients who are diagnosed and those around them. Ellen Forney in her graphic memoir Marbles seeks to reframe how her bipolar disorder is thought of, both by others but more importantly by herself, as she grapples with her diagnosis and treatment.… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: The Eye of the Storm: Safe Spaces and the Reframing of Mental Illness in Ellen Forney’s Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, & Me

comics, discussion, fandoms, marvel, movies/tv, review, throwback thursday

Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) Characters You Didn’t Realize Are Queer In The Comics 

Marvel Comics, one of the big two comic book publishers alongside DC comics, was founded in 1939 as Timely Comics, and by the 1960s had changed its name to the now recognized Marvel Comics. The Walt Disney Company purchased Marvel Comics in 2009.  Comic book writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby are often considered… Continue reading Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) Characters You Didn’t Realize Are Queer In The Comics 

books, review, throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: Reaction Paper and Book Review of Junky by William S. Burroughs

Junky by William S. Burroughs (1953), is a novel detailing the experiences that narrator Bill Lee has both using and selling a variety of drugs. The novel is considered to be pseudo-autobiographical and based on Burroughs’ own experiences with drugs and addiction. The novel has a very loose structure, being divided more into scenes via… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: Reaction Paper and Book Review of Junky by William S. Burroughs

throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: “But Sometimes They Hurt”: The Disability Representation of Barbara Gordon as Oracle

“But Sometimes They Hurt”: The Disability Representation of Barbara Gordon as Oracle Despite backlash arguing for her cure, comic book writers John Ostrander and Kim Yale persisted in their portrayal of Barabara Gordon as the superhero Oracle, being the first to revive her character after her apparent death in the story The Killing Joke, wherein… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: “But Sometimes They Hurt”: The Disability Representation of Barbara Gordon as Oracle

throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: Performative Existence: Using Kundera’s Taxonomy of Looks To Examine Character Motivation and Nature

Performative Existence: Using Kundera’s Taxonomy of Looks To Examine Character Motivation and Nature In his 1984 philosophical novel The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera gives an explanation of four categories of people. These categories are separated by the “kind of look [they] wish to live under.” This so-called taxonomy of looks is as follows: “We… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: Performative Existence: Using Kundera’s Taxonomy of Looks To Examine Character Motivation and Nature

throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: Adapt or Fail: On Movie Adaptations

Adapt or Fail: On Movie Adaptations Film adaptation of novels is an increasingly common practice. For her part, Virginia Woolf was vocally against the practice of adaptation. She referred to cinema as a “parasite” and literature as the “prey.” This sense of the biological could be seen in another light however. Adaptation is the key… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: Adapt or Fail: On Movie Adaptations

throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: The Virgin Suicides: On Controlling The Narrative

The Virgin Suicides: On Controlling The Narrative The Virgin Suicides (2000), directed by Sofia Coppola, begs the question: who is in control of the narrative of the five Lisbon sisters? The boys who recount the story of their deaths? Their parents, particularly their mother, who is increasingly overbearing after Cecelia’s death? The girls themselves, through… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: The Virgin Suicides: On Controlling The Narrative

throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday: “May You Find Your Way As Pleasant”: Captain Pike’s Disability and Cure in Star Trek’s “The Menagerie”

“May You Find Your Way As Pleasant”: Captain Pike’s Disability and Cure in Star Trek’s “The Menagerie” The Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS) episode “The Menagerie” (1966), a two-part episode, reintroduces viewers to the character of Captain Christopher Pike, who had not been featured since his debut in the original pilot episode “The Cage”. It… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: “May You Find Your Way As Pleasant”: Captain Pike’s Disability and Cure in Star Trek’s “The Menagerie”

College, personal, school, throwback thursday, writing

Throwback Thursday: Urbanization and Medicine in Mid-18th to Mid-19th Century Britain

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years. Urbanization and Medicine in Mid-18th to Mid-19th Century Britain This… Continue reading Throwback Thursday: Urbanization and Medicine in Mid-18th to Mid-19th Century Britain