The Book Blogger Insider Tag

I wasn’t tagged, but I saw this over at Drizzle and Hurricane Books and thought it looked like fun!


Rules

Answer the questions below.
Credit the creator: Camryn @The Writing Crafter.
Tag at least 5 people.
Have fun!


1) Where do you typically write your blog posts?

My desk in my room where my desktop is. Never anywhere else, though I jot down ideas in the notes app of my phone a lot everywhere else.

2) How long does it generally take you to write a book review?

Anywhere from 20 minutes to agonizing over everything for 4 hours. Generally, there is no in-between with me.

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3) When did you start your book blog?

I started this blog in January 2015. But I didn’t get serious about it until later into 2016.

4) What is the worst thing about having a book blog in your opinion?

Time.

Stress.

I have terrible time management when it comes to this blog, and the TBR pile and having to post is just another stress in the long line of things I have to be stressed about.

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5) What is the best thing about having a book blog in your opinion?

Getting to talk to people about books, meeting people, making friends, having a consistent hobby. Take your pick.

6) What blog post have you had the most fun writing so far?

There have been a few. Off the top of my head, some are:

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Things I Want To See More Of In YA

Poem: Despite Your Heart Of Gold (I’m Not The One You Need To Save)

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Things That Make Me Want To Read A Book

Discussion: Review Copies/ARCs

Buddy Read – Book Review: And I Darken

Panic! At The Disco Book Tag (Original)

Entirely non-comprehensive of course.

7) What is your favourite type of blog post to write?

I really like writing discussions and story type posts. They don’t tend to come out very good, but they feel the most personal/conversational and I like them.

I also like the Top Ten Tuesdays usually.

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8) When do you typically write?

In the morning when I have time to kill, at night when I’m avoiding some other responsibility like dishes/laundry, or on weekends while I lounge around watching TV and should be reading probably.

9) Do you review every book you read?

I try to. Sometimes it doesn’t happen, but I try to.

10) How do you write your book reviews? With a cup of coffee or tea? With Netflix? Cuddled with your fur baby?

My cat doesn’t cuddle me, he’s my sister’s. I swear she trained him to bite me.

If I’m writing in the morning I have coffee, but I don’t seek it for writing time. Usually I;m watching Youtube videos or Netflix while I’m blogging. Definitely.

11) When do you write your book reviews? Right after finishing the book? Two weeks after finishing the book?

I try my best to review books as soon as I finish them – or at least within the week. Usually I’ll write the review and schedule it for later (next open Friday on the schedule or, if its an arc, for release day).

12) How often do you post?

Lately I’ve been trying for minimum 3 times a week. Sometimes more, but thats usually it. I have a few monthly posts that I do (like Throwback Thursday) and I usually try to do a few weekly memes (T5W and TTT), but my basic schedule is a tag on Monday, a discussion or etc. on Wednesday, and a review  on Friday.

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My Tags

B @ Icebreaker694

Raquel @ Rakiodd Books

Kayla @ KDrew The Bookworm

Lashaan and Trang @ Bookidote

Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek

Sophie @ Blame it on Chocolate

Alex @ Lord of the Trekkies

The Orangutan Librarian

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Discussion: Do ARC Reviews HAVE To Be Positive?

Aren’t you proud of me? Being all consistent and writing discussions regularly for the first time ever? I told you had a list of ideas a mile long – I’m just working through it now.

Anyways. Onto the discussion you came here for.


I’ve seen a handful of bloggers touch upon this topic and I wanted to give my own view of it. Arcs are, especially, a book blogger’s lifeblood – one of my most popular discussion posts is on How To Request ARCs.

And for many of us, they are a perk to our hobby – but they are also a responsibility.

Regardless of your stance on negative reviews in general, we have do decide if its okay to negatively review on ARC.

ARC, simply put, stands for Advanced Readers/Review Copy.

An ARCs entire purpose of existence is to generate prerelease reviews and hype, so that the book sells better. Obviously, positive reviews are whats going to accomplish this, not negative reviews.

But upon reviewing an ARC, we all give a statement along the lines of “I received this book for free but it doesn’t influence my opinion”. I think for most of us, thats not even a conscious thing to write, its a legal, automatic, robotic thing. Like a user agreement – you mark agree and proceed to ignore it.

Even if you don’t consciously tailor reviews because its an ARC, I think it subconsciously motivates us to try and like the book a bit more – we feel bad giving a negative review when a publisher/author went out of their way, and spent money, to have us review the book.

But we need to be honest – thats the only way book blogs function. If our readers can trust us, if our fellow book bloggers can trust us.

If you heartily dislike the book – and you don’t want to give a negative review, maybe contact the publisher and let them know. Give them your feedback.

Otherwise, be careful with what you request or accept – if you’re not sure about it, don’t take it just because its offered – you don’t want to get yourself in that position.

Now, if you are reviewing an ARC, and you didn’t like it, DON’T BASH IT.

Explain why did and why did not work for you – what made you dislike it, its it a personal/subjective reason? Could others of certain tastes like it? Is the writing objectively good? Even if its a low rating, can you mention some positives?

We want to promote books. We want ARCs to serve their intended purpose, but not at the sake of our integrity. Be honest – just don’t be harsh or cruel.


What do you think?

Do you agree with me?

Do you have a different stance?

Let me know!

Discussion: Unhauling Books

With ever growing TBRs and book collections comes ever decreasing shelf space.

Especially when book bloggers move houses or go off to college.
Shelf space is a hot commodity not to be trifled with.

One ever common way to deal with this is the book unhaul.

Bloggers either donate books or host giveaways for books they no longer want on their shelves.


Different bloggers have different criteria for unhauls.

Some do it periodically to rid themselves of books below a certain star rating or that they distinctly disliked.

Some giveaway arcs they’ve finished.

Some get rid of old / beat up / or multiple copies of the same books. Sometimes it’s just a book they don’t intend to reread.

This is a good thing – or spreads the book Iove and stops your shelf from killing you in your sleep.


But I think I’m incapable of it.

Over the years I’ve turned in a handful of books to second hand stores, give.
A few to my sister or cousins.
But I am overwhelmingly a hoarder.

I always have been.
I probably always will.

I should probably embrace the unhauling.
Someday.
Someday.
Maybe.

Or next year when I’m packing up for college and start feeling the urge to set things on fire so I don’t have to deal with them.


What do you think?

Do you unhaul books?

NetGalley Review: Breaking Up Is Hard To Do (But You Could Have Done It Better)

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I received an e-arc of this book from netgalley and this is my honest review.

Original Release Date:

January 10th 2017

Date I Read The Book:

March 2017

My Star Rating:

3 Stars

Official Summary:

Anonymous break up stories from men and women, old and young, serious and silly and the cartoons that inspired them. Author and artist Hilary Campbell turns the painful into the hilarious, validating emotions from forgotten middle school tragedies to relationships that ended only hours ago.

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and cartoonist. Her films have won top prizes at Slamdance, SF IndieFest, and more. She was the co-illustrator of Jessica Bennett’s critically acclaimed Feminist Fight Club.Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, But You Could’ve Done Better is her first book of cartoons.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

I read through this book in about 30 minutes after finishing an essay in class and was waiting for everyone else to finish.

It was enjoyable enough, a short, pretty funny read.

The illustrations are well done and the funniest part of the book.

But several of the submissions feel flat, or were too similar to be repetitively funny. Others were very funny, but with the writing styles and lengths inconsistent, and all the stories being straight, probably unedited submissions from others, it felt like you should get more from a book you buy.

It was pretty funny, and I enjoyed it, but it wasn’t the best.

Discussion: On DNF Books And Reviews

DNF stands for “Did Not Finish” – an acronym you’ve probably heard around the book blogging community before.


People DNF books all the time, for all sorts of reasons.

Because they just weren’t liking the book.
Because they were bored.
Because they took a particular issue with the book (problematic /trope they dislike etc.).

Everyone has their own policy on this and I can’t speak for everyone.


I personally dislike DNFing books – it feels dishonest to pass judgement if I didn’t see it through.

I have only DNFed a handful of books. Generally because the content made me physically uncomfortable (like Nerdy and the Dirty) or I am extremely bored / disengaged / hitting a reading slump because of a book. Especially recently with my growing TBR.
Usually, if I put a book down, it’s with the intention of coming back later.


But why?
Why feel guilty about not enjoying a book and doing without it?
Book reviews are often subjective – what I enjoy or don’t enjoy may influence those of similar opinions – but it isn’t the end all be all of a books worth or who may enjoy it even if I don’t.


Recently my views of DNFing has changed. I think it’s okay. We read because our enjoy it, why continue if it becomes a chore. But we should explain ourselves.
Why did we DNF a book?
Something objective or something  subjective in its influence?
Could others potentially like it?
And definitely don’t bash a book you couldn’t finish – that I do see as unfair.


What do you think?

Do you agree with me?

What do you think of DNF books?

Netgalley Review: Man Vs. Child – One Dad’s Guide to the Weirdness of Parenting

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I received an e-arc of this book from netgalley and this is my honest review.


Original Release Date:

May 9th, 2017

Date I Read The Book:

May 2017

My Star Rating:

5 Stars


Official Summary:

Moms have hundreds of parenting advice books willing to tackle the more cringe-inducing questions of parenthood. But what about books for the other half of the equation: the dads? Man vs. Child is a funny, fresh take on the parenting guide, written from the dad’s perspective.

Author and popular Upright Citizens Brigade performer Doug Moe knows first-time fathers are as worried about being terrible at their new terrifying jobs as new moms are. But while most modern fathering guides center on men’s oafish parental failings, Man vs. Child forgoes condescension in favor of fresh and irreverent wit. This guide for first-time dads tackles funny but important questions, like how to be a good dad without becoming a BabyBjörn-wearing tool in the process, or what to do if your child loves your iPad more than they love you. From caring for a newborn to dealing with a kid on the verge of adolescence, author Doug Moe breaks fatherhood down into survival lessons like “Time to Decide About God” and quizzes that ask dads to reflect on hilarious parenting questions like “Is My Child Too Annoying for This Restaurant?”

Chapters include:
-Newborn: Keeping This Weird Thing Alive Awhile, Even As It Tries to Kill You
-Your Interesting Baby, Maybe the Most Interesting Baby Ever
-Man v Toddler: Does Your Toddler Want to Kill You?
-Now That My Kid Doesn’t Need Me, What Is My Life Worth?

Balancing relatable humor with heartfelt advice, Man vs. Child will appeal to any dad looking for both laughs and real guidance from a man who has had—and survived—these experiences himself. A perfect Father’s Day gift or present for a first-time dad!


My Review: 

Don’t even ask why I, a 17 year old girl with no plans to have children for – at least – a decade, has requested, read and now, reviewed a parenting book. I have a bad habit of requesting random things on Netgalley on a whim when bored.

That being said, I found this pretty funny and well written.

Man vs. Child makes no secret what it is a humor book about parenting but not really meant to offer concrete advice. There is no – or at least, very little – in the way of “scientifically this is how you care for a child” but rather a funny commentary on becoming a dad and being a stay-at-home dad raising your child. Its light-hearted, quick, and while not particularly informative, witty, well written and entertaining.

Make of that what you will when deciding to read it.

Discussion: Struggles Of A Book Blogger

Being a book blogger is weird, because it’s a hobby, at least for most it isn’t a job, and it’s fun.

But it’s also stressful like a real job – and requires a hell of a lot of effort, especially if your on your own.

Here, I’m discussing the 7 major things that can cause book bloggers stress.


Procrastination

Time management is a big thing. For most book bloggers, blogging isn’t a job it’s a hobby, which means carving out time to do it – and fun as it is, that’s not always possible. And even when it is, it can be hard to push your self to read or write when your brain is fried from real life.

Which leads to procrastination. Which is how you get the “accidental five month hiatuses” that my blog is no known for.

I deal with this by scheduling posts. Like last summer for while I was at camp, and like I have now for AP season – so I don’t have to worry about consolidating my melted brain so form a sensical string of words.

What do you do?


Stress Over Posting

Even when we do post, it brings a different kind of anxiety. Are people going to like it or hate it? Is it too over done? Is this original content stupid? Did I unleash too much of my weirdness at once? Did j say something dumb a future admissions officer will see and reject me for? (This last fear is one instilled in me by a very college oriented high school – like I needed more reasons to stress out).

These are legitimate concerns, and ones not easy to quell. This is the main reason generally behind my several month hiatuses to be honest.


Ever Growing TBR

This one is unique to book bloggers.

The ever Growing TBR.

TBR stands for To Be Read – a list of books a book blogger intends to read, and be a physical stack of book towering in ones room, can be a list online or wishlist of books to buy, can be a stack of arcs, or a massive ebook library – but the result is the same.

Sooner or later the TBR of s book blogger outgrows the reading speed – and threatens to crush them. Often this impending crushing can increase the prevalence of a reading slump and we get indecisive over what to read next and then just don’t. A vicious cycle.

Generally deadlines can get you reading again, but deadlines for reviews can bring their own kind of stress.

I myself have too many books in my TBR – a review TBR of about 50 and a physical TBR of too many to deal with.


Pressure For Content / The Look

The look of the blog matters.

Trying our best to improve the look of the blog, from graphics to the layout to the design to the domain is a big thing for us book bloggers. But when you don’t have the resources to get help and don’t have the skill to make good things yourself – it makes you feel a little behind the curve sometimes.

The pressure for the right look also applies to the content.

People like tags and memes. They are the life of book blogs. But too many and your blog is labeled unoriginal and boring.

Book reviews are a major thing. But so many discussions are being done on, really, other book bloggers don’t read book reviews – you might not even need them. But without them are you even really a book blog? But you can’t exactly churn out so many reviews since it takes time to actually read books- so what do you do?

The answer: Original content.

The elusive gold of book blogging.
It’s hard to come up with original posts consistently. And to be honest, most of us either take inspiration from or flat out copy each other (with credit unless your a terrible person). We do similar discussions and lists etc. But the continuing strive for better original content can keep you awake at night, thinking of ideas and second guessing yourself.

It’s hard to sustain.

So cut bloggers a break when there’s a lull in content okay? Okay.


Reviews / Discussions

Back to book reviews.
Every book blogger pretty much does reviews. In different styles with different frequency, but it is a staple of book blogging. (Though I read a great discussion at The Tattooed Book Geek that argues otherwise).

Reviews tend to take a long time though, so their less frequent – even if your reading pretty quickly.

Discussions are another thing – when everything seems to had been said but you still can to join in, what do you say? And how do you say t without sounding preachy or cheesy?


Role In The Industry

Sometimes other people read your stuff, and take your opinions seriously. Sometimes, I don’t feel qualified to be giving my opinion. I’m a kid! I’m 17! I have no authority! Except the fact that I’m a book blogger gives me a small amount of authority in a limited capacity – and it is occasionally terrifying.

I face this fear when I get review requests. People email me like I’m a professional. ADULTS email me asking me for my help/knowledge/influence and it’s weird. It feels like you can’t say no because, your just a kid and this is an adult. It’s a weird position, and not a universal struggle I’ll admit, just one I think about a lot.


Comparing Stats

Ah yes the stats. The thing everyone says not to worry about and yet everyone does.

But it’s hard not to.

When another blogger gets more comments or more likes then you.

When someone who’s been blogging for less time surpasses your follower count.

It’s hard to to try and measure up success. It hard not to get jealous. And want to be better than others. It’s human nature.

But sometimes being so concerned with stats can suck some joy out of blogging – that that sucks. But it’s honest.


This has been some of the struggles I’ve experienced being a book blogger – its fun, I love it, but people need to understand that it isn’t easy or quick before they start their own blogs or start getting snippy with bloggers for not posting more often. We’re only human.

Do you experience any of these?

Did I miss something glaringly obvious?

Let me know!

GIVEAWAY: Gork, The Teenage Dragon

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Fans of Harry Potter and Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy will relish this teenage dragon’s spellbinding love story filled with bighearted humor and imagination.

“No good human won’t love this dragon named Gork.”—Dave Eggers

Gork isn’t like the other dragons at WarWings Military Academy. He has a gigantic heart, two-inch horns, and an occasional problem with fainting. His nickname is Weak Sauce and his Will to Power ranking is Snacklicious–the lowest in his class. But Gork is determined not to let any of this hold him back as he embarks on the most important mission of his life: tonight, on the eve of his high school graduation, he must ask a female dragon to be his queen. If she says yes, they’ll go off to conquer a foreign planet together. If she says no, Gork becomes a slave.

Vying with Jocks, Nerds, Mutants, and Multi-Dimensioners to find his mate, Gork encounters an unforgettable cast of friends and foes, including Dr. Terrible, the mad scientist; Fribby, a robot dragon obsessed with death; and Metheldra, a healer specializing in acupuncture with swords. But finally it is Gork’s biggest perceived weakness, his huge heart, that will guide him through his epic quest and help him reach his ultimate destination: planet Earth.

A love story, a fantasy, a coming-of-age story, Gork the Teenage Dragon is a wildly comic, beautifully imagined, and deeply heartfelt debut novel that shows us just how human a dragon can be.

Hardcover, 400 pages
Expected publication: July 11th 2017 by Knopf Publishing Group

Giveaway Details:

First, legal stuff.

This giveaway is legally a sweepstakes.

  • “Sweepstakes: A giveaway where a winner is chosen at random. No purchase is necessary to enter a sweepstakes.” – Definition from Parchment Girl
  • “No purchase necessary”
  • “Void where prohibited by law”
  • “The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning”

Sponser: The prize for this giveaway (1 Hardcover copy of Gork, The Teenage Dragon) was given to me by Penguin Random House for the purpose of this giveaway.

Official Rules

This giveaway will run from July 2nd to July 30th 2017 12:00 P.M EST

Prize

One winner will receive one hardcover copy of Gork, The Teenage Dragon by Gabe Hudson

Approximate Retail Value: $24.95

Eligibility

This giveaway is open to US residents only.

Must be over the age of 13 (with parent permission) or over the age of 18 (without).

 

How To Enter

To enter, comment down below with something approximating “I am entering this giveaway” and tell me why you want to read Gork, The Teenage Dragon.

In your comment, leave me a method for contacting you if you win (twitter DM, email, etc.).

Extra entries if you:

-Follow my blog.

-Follow me on twitter (@rivermoosevlogs)

(1 extra entry each, say so in your comment, I will be checking)

The winner will be chosen at random using this generator. All entries will be added from comments.

It is preferred, though not mandatory, that the winner review the book on their own blog, Goodreads, and/or a retailer’s site.

When A Winner Is Chosen

After the entry period ends (on release date), I will randomly pick a winner using a generator. Said winner will be contacted through method detailed in entry comment. The winner will have 3 days to message me back, with their address, so I may ship the prize.

If the winner does not respond, a new winner will be chosen.

Once the prize has been shipped, the winner will be posted on this page.

Please allow a couple of weeks for the prize to be shipped. I will message the winner once I have officially shipped the prize with confirmation.

I am not responsible if the package is lost or damaged in the mail, neither is Penguin Random House.


PRAISE FOR GORK

“Like nothing you’ve ever read before—a quirky, wildly fun ride.”—BuzzFeed’s Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer

Gork, the Teenage Dragon combines so many things I count on in fiction I love—great expansive humor, a big-hearted optimism about all that’s possible in the world and in fiction, a very clear moral purpose and a sense of social responsibility—plus a willingness to experiment with the form of writing, to push the art of writing further, and with passion.”
Dave Eggers, author of Heroes of the Frontier and The Circle

Gork, the Teenage Dragon is a hilarious ride through the mind-bending and capacious universe, a one-of-a-kind coming-of-age story for the big-hearted and beleaguered. Mostly, it’s a reminder that, now especially, we on planet Earth need a whole lot more dreamer-poets, a whole lot more gentle peace-loving fools.”
Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Life on Mars and Ordinary Light

Gork, the Teenage Dragon is jam-packed with outrageous storytelling and soulful humor in the glorious American tradition of Kurt Vonnegut and Mark Twain. Who knew a dragon’s coming-of-age story could be filled with so much humanity?” 
Gary Shteyngart, author of Super Sad True Love Story

“Gork’s got it going on. His secret weapon? Poetry! This wonderful, big-hearted, crazy novel is a testament to Gabe Hudson’s ingenious imagination.”
Elizabeth McKenzie, author of The Portable Veblen

“It’s hard not to love a story about a dragon with a spaceship that cribs its plot from a John Hughes movie. The hyperkinetic teen-dragon comedy-romance you never knew you wanted.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“Cleverly plotted and executed. . . . Gork’s amusing growing-up story unfolds in vignettes of encounters with various kooky fellow dragons. Throughout, Hudson makes generally witty and occasionally brilliant reflections on humans’ often reptilian behavior.”
—Publishers Weekly

“Genre-bending, age-defying appeal. . . . Gork has one thing going for him: a big, generous heart. Seriously, literary sentimentalists, can you resist?”
—Library Journal

“Like a mad scramble to find the right date for prom—but with dragons. Gork might have a ‘scaly green ass,’ but teens will laugh and relate to his desperate search for a date. Recommend this one to fans of offbeat science fiction and fantasy, such as the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series.”
—Booklist

“Big-hearted and gawky, Gork gives us a lovable loser sure to win the hearts of sci-fi readers and fans of offbeat comedies.” 
Shelf Awareness

“Harry Potter meets Sixteen Candles meets The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy . . . with one unforgettable hero: Gork.” 


“Gork, the Teenage Dragon induced in me such madcap, heartfelt delight and joy, like getting drunk but WITHOUT impaired faculties and PLUS dragons.”
Alice Sola Kim, 2016 Whiting Award Winner

“Gabe Hudson’s fire-breathing, page-scorching creation, Gork the dragon, is more human and big-hearted and generous than most people I know. This book is as sly and smart as it is hilarious.”
Ben Marcus, author of The Flame Alphabet

Gork the Teenage Dragon is on fire! It’s magnificent and exuberant and ferociously funny, and it’s also one of the most moving coming-of-age stories to appear in a long time.”
Paul La Farge, author of The Night Ocean

“An epic love story that is wondrous, enchanting, hilarious, and heartrending. This dragon Gork is a direct descendant of Huck Finn and Holden Caulfield, and his voice is a marvel of comic timing and pathos. Gork, the Teenage Dragon is sure to become an instant classic, destined to be loved by all sorts of readers through the ages.”
Akhil Sharma, author of Family Life

“A humorous coming-of-age story with a deeply heartfelt message.”
Signature Reads

“A witty sense of humor. . . . If you’re a fan of the Greek God’s series of books (Percy Jackson) by Rick Riordan, you’ll be a fan of this one. It’s a mythical story with a great adventure, a love story and dragons!”
—RedCarpetCrash.com

Discussion: Ways To Organize A Bookshelf

This is a pretty popular discussion – but I wanted to give my take on it, as I have a pretty unique system of organizing my bookshelf.

Here are five common organization methods to try out on your shelves – along with my own method (feel free to try it).


Color:

This one is very popular on bookstagram and booktube – though I personally have little interest as it seems like it would get annoying after a while -(per the order of the books having no rhyme or reason and series being separated).

But essentially, separate your books by spine color and lay them on the shelf to form a rainbow. It’s pleasing to look at even for the non-book hoarder.


Library System / Genre and Author:

This is a mix of organization systems – but you could do either individually. (As in, separate solely by author or solely by genre).

By genre is essentially, separating genres of books onto different shelves or sections so you can easily find a book for whatever mood you are in.

By author is generally by last name in alphabetical order.

If you do these in conjunction – alphabetizing authors within each genre section – then it becomes very easy to find a particular book rather than remembering where the hell you stuck it.


By Favorites:

Pretty simple. But your favorite reads at the center / eye level / front of the shelf and hide less favorites at the corners or back.

Your shelf will personally make you happier to look at. Since you’ll be staring mostly at you favorite books. This might also make it easier to write tag posts, as you’ll have your favorites in view.


By TBR:

You can do this two ways.

If you have multiple shelves, one can be read books and the other unread.

If you only have one shelf you can use half for read books and the other half unread books if you don’t want them mixing.

Or you can employ my chosen method – useful if you want to keep authors and genres together that are only particularly read: within a different organization method – put unread books vertically and read books horizontally as I prefer (but you could always do it the other way around).


Separate Hard- and Paper-Backs:

This ones simple – separate the hardcovers from the paperbacks.

Put the paperbacks in the back or the corners so they aren’t the focus, and the hardcovers more at eye level, center or main shelf – prettier and more eye catching and makes for a nicer overall bookshelf. Could also be done in conjunction with “By Favorites”.


My Method:

Obviously, some of these methods are not mutely exclusive. You can organize by both genre and author. By color and still separate hardcovers from paperbacks. Color coordinate TBR separated bookshelves etc.

My chosen organization is this:
By genre, by favorites, and by TBR.

Here’s what I mean.

I have one free standing shelf and two wall mounted shelves.

Books I love and books I need to read soon go in the free standing shelf (easier to reach – separated by genre and from each other within this).

Books of genres I read least or have the least to-be-read books within the genre go on the top / harder to reach wall mounted shelf. And so one.

Read books are horizontal and unread books are vertical. So unread books are easier to get. And read books overall take up less space, so as I read I get minimally more shelf space.


 Let me know what you think.

How do you organize your shelf?

Has this inspired you to try something new?

Which is your favorite?

I Messed Up Book Tag

I was tagged by Icebreaker694, who is a lovely and talented writer, so go check her out!

(Yes I am many months late with this…let’s just ignore that).

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A CHARACTER APPEARANCE THAT YOU MISREAD OR IMAGINED DIFFERENTLY?

I ALWAYS think Jace from TMI has blue eyes.(His eyes are gold)

And I always forget Cammie from Gallager Girls is meant to be light brown / bleached – I always think its brown for some reason.

I’m sure there are more, but I’m blanking.


A CHARACTER  NAME YOU’VE BEEN PRONOUNCING WRONG?

Everything written by Sarah J Maas.

I’m bad at names at the best of times – I’ve mostly begun mumbling the names and recognizing them without being able to say them.


AN OVERUSED TROPE THAT IS YOUR GUILTY PLEASURE?

Enemies to lovers – its the sort of slow-burn / a little angsty mostly fluffy romance I like in my contemporaries.

See also – friends to lovers.

I also love villain redemption arcs – but I never see those EVER – I need more of them.


A CLICHE CHARACTER TYPE THAT YOU LIKED BETTER SEEING ON-SCREEN THAN READING ABOUT?

Honestly, most side/best friend characters are hilarious on screen but fall flat and 2-dimensional in books.


A WORD/PHRASE THAT YOU LEARNED BECAUSE OF ITS USE IN A BOOK?

Masochist –

This is the first word that came to my brain for this question, because little 4th grade me learn it from Twilight and had to continuously explain why I knew such a high level word at age 9.


HAVE YOU EVER NOT READ/NOT COMPLETED A READING REQUIREMENT FOR SCHOOL?

I gave up on The Count of Monte Cristo – I have powered though many an assignment but I couldn’t. It was too long, I was too bored. I read sparksnotes.


HAVE YOU EVER (OR HAVE WANTED TO) SKIPPED A CHAPTER FROM THE POINT OF VIEW YOU WEREN’T INTEREST IN?

I’ve looked ahead to when the characters I liked more would appear – for example, looking for Annabeth or Percy POV for Heroes of Olympus – but I’ve never flat out skipped.


HAVE YOU EVER CANCELLED SOCIAL PLANS TO READ A BOOK?

Yes…

Sometimes…

More often then not I bring my book with me and ignore my social plan companions though.

(I swear I do have social skills)


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I TAG

McKenzie @ Bookish Things and Tea

Megan @ Bookslayer Reads

Catia @ The Girl Who Read Too Much

Danielle @ Books, Vertigo and Tea

Ryann The Reader

Reg @ She Latitude

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