Book Review: Not If I See You First

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Original Release Date:

December 1st 2015

Date I Read The Book:

January 2017

My Star Rating:

3.5 stars

Chronology:

Standalone

Official Summary:

The Rules:

Don’t deceive me. Ever. Especially using my blindness. Especially in public.

Don’t help me unless I ask. Otherwise you’re just getting in my way or bothering me.

Don’t be weird. Seriously, other than having my eyes closed all the time, I’m just like you only smarter.

Parker Grant doesn’t need 20/20 vision to see right through you. That’s why she created the Rules: Don’t treat her any differently just because she’s blind, and never take advantage. There will be no second chances. Just ask Scott Kilpatrick, the boy who broke her heart.

When Scott suddenly reappears in her life after being gone for years, Parker knows there’s only one way to react—shun him so hard it hurts. She has enough on her mind already, like trying out for the track team (that’s right, her eyes don’t work but her legs still do), doling out tough-love advice to her painfully naive classmates, and giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn’t cried since her dad’s death three months ago. But avoiding her past quickly proves impossible, and the more Parker learns about what really happened—both with Scott, and her dad—the more she starts to question if things are always as they seem. Maybe, just maybe, some Rules are meant to be broken.

Combining a fiercely engaging voice with true heart, debut author Eric Lindstrom’s Not If I See You First illuminates those blind spots that we all have in life, whether visually impaired or not.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

I really liked this book, liked its portrayal of blindness as a fact of life needing accommodation but not pity – Parker is fully capable. And as a disability rarely seen in YA, I liked its representation (though I cannot claim it to be accurate as I have no experience be it first or second hand).

I did like the character development and the backstory that is built through out.

What I didn’t like was the abrupt nature of the ending, of her forgiveness of Scott after one conversation. The love triangle was unnecessary and the ending felt rushed. Even if the romance between her and Scott was cute.

They raised questions of her dad’s death – that it may not be an accident – without resolving them. Why raise questions if they don’t progress the story at all? And her aunt felt very “Cinderella’s step-mother” in the beginning and I disliked it.

Thats why I rated it a middling 3.5 stars.

 

 

 

Book Review: Ask The Passengers

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Original Release Date:

October 23rd 2012

Date I Read The Book:

January 2017

My Star Rating:

3.5 stars

Chronology:

Standalone

Official Summary:

Astrid Jones desperately wants to confide in someone, but her mother’s pushiness and her father’s lack of interest tell her they’re the last people she can trust. Instead, Astrid spends hours lying on the backyard picnic table watching airplanes fly overhead. She doesn’t know the passengers inside, but they’re the only people who won’t judge her when she asks them her most personal questions–like what it means that she’s falling in love with a girl.

As her secret relationship becomes more intense and her friends demand answers, Astrid has nowhere left to turn. She can’t share the truth with anyone except the people at thirty thousand feet, and they don’t even know she’s there. But little does Astrid know just how much even the tiniest connection will affect these strangers’ lives–and her own–for the better.

In this truly original portrayal of a girl struggling to break free of society’s definitions, Printz Honor author A.S. King asks readers to question everything–and offers hope to those who will never stop seeking real love.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

While I enjoyed this book alright, I was disappointed in it.

So many book-bloggers and book tubers LOVE AS King and I just…didn’t. It was merely okay.

The writing was good, I liked the style. I liked the realism of her characters and her story.

But it felt too open-ended for me, we didn’t get enough resolution, the character growth didn’t seem earned – like it happened when we weren’t looking. We didn’t get enough backstory – like Astrid and her mom don’t get along, but we never really find out why. Her parents aren’t homophobes, but they don’t accept Astrid and its never really talked about.

I did like that it was diverse, its a lesbian romance with multi-dimensional characters and not-heavily stereotyped.

I liked the little plane passenger excerpts too.

I liked the book – I just had such high expectations I was underwhelmed by it.

I will check out some of her other books though, and I’d recommend it her anyone who can take it with a grain of salt – it won’t be the best book ever, but it is a pretty good one.

 

NetGalley Review: Get It Together, Delilah!

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I received an e-arc of this book from netgalley and this is my honest review.

Original Release Date:

April 4th, 2017

Date I Read The Book:

January 2017

My Star Rating:

4 stars

Chronology:

Standalone

Official Summary:

A story about falling in love, literally.

Seventeen-year-old Delilah Green wouldn’t have chosen to do her last year of school this way, but she figures it’s working fine. Her dad is on a trip to fix his broken heart after her mom left him for another man, so Del’s managing the family café in his absence. Easy, she thinks. But what about:
– homework and the nasty posse of mean girls making her life hell
– or how one of Del’s best friends won’t stop guilt-tripping her
– and her other best friend is so in love with his tutor he might go to jail for her if Del doesn’t do something

But who cares about any of that really, because above all else, she can’t stop thinking about beautiful Rosa who dances every night across the street until one day Rosa comes in the café door . . .

And if Rosa starts thinking about Del, too, then how in the name of caramel milkshakes will Del get the rest of it together?

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

Delilah is awkward and stubborn and I loved her, even if I wanted to smack her silly for not telling her dad about things and for dropping out of school which made me stressed out FOR HER, despite being a fictional character. Her motivations are real, and she is well developed. All the characters are.

The romance is super cute, and slow going, its very realistic, there is no immediate happily ever after, most of the characters act like idiots very often but by being fallible they are real.

I loved the setting and I loved the story, all the little details brought it to life and I highly recommend it!

 

NetGalley Review – Nemesis #1: Dreadnought

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I received an e-arc of this book from netgalley and this is my honest review.

Original Release Date:

January 24th 2017

Date I Read The Book:

January 2017

My Star Rating:

4 stars

Chronology:

First in a series

Official Summary:

Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of the world’s greatest superhero. Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, she was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But then her second-hand superpowers transformed her body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but between her father’s dangerous obsession with curing her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and the classmate who is secretly a masked vigilante, Danny’s first weeks living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined.

She doesn’t have much time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer, a cyborg named Utopia, still haunts the streets of New Port City. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

Diversity!

Often, diverse books are contemporaries, as if a gay/trans/etc. character cannot star in a fantasy or sic-fi plot because their plot revolves around being gay/trans/etc.

I like diverse contemporaries, but I’m glad we got a ski-fi book too, because this book was great!

I thought the subject of Danny being trans was well written and well handled, though I have no first-hand experience with such things, so take my words with a grain of salt.

Danny had a unique, refreshing voice, and I loved her. Loved the way she got her powers and why. I loved the side characters (even the ones I hated, they added to the story), the villain was amazing, and Sarah’s backstory was my favorite thing (Danny and Sarah would also make the cutest couple).

The plot was well paced, you’re grabbed from the beginning and I didn’t get bored once. (I read this in about 2 days).

If you like superhero stories, or if you’re looking for a diverse read, I highly recommend picking this one up!