Throwback Thursday: Color Your World

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.


 

In kindergarten, there was only one debate bigger than “Crayola v. Rozart” (and really, everyone knows that Crayola is the winner there). That argument is, of course, “what color is this?” Common contenders of this fight are:  red/orange and blue/green, both of which probably have actual names that no one uses. But the argument, actually more like all out war, of my kindergarten class was over a color from the Rozart box, called Orchid.

Orchid is this pink/purple color that was a favorite among the girls of the class. Of course, because no one could read, no one knew it was called Orchid, so we all called it pink or purple depending on the side of the argument you fell on.

I was firmly entrenched in the belief that it was purple. My kindergarten best friend firmly believed it was pink. In order to salvage our friendship from this crushing betrayal, we settled on naming the color “pinkish-purplish”(a perfectly acceptable name considering we were five years old).

Of course, we had to explain to our peers why we were very obviously correct in our naming, and everyone else was wrong. So, we gave the crayon an origin story, and this is that origin story: Once upon a time, a pink crayon and a purple crayon got married and had a baby. That baby was a perfect mix of pink and purple. The crayon parents argued about which one of them the baby should be named after. Finally they came to an agreement, and thus the crayon was named “pinkish-purplish”.

Again, this made perfect sense to a group of five year olds. And although our teacher crushed our little hearts by telling us the crayons real name was Orchid, we never did stop calling it pinkish-purpleish.

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School Required Reading Reviews: Pride & Prejudice / A Thousand Splendid Suns / The Death of Ivan Ilych

Okay, so…

These are really late. But, I wanted to post them anyways.

Enjoy!


1885

Original Release Date:

Published October 10th 2000 by Modern Library (first published 1813)

Date I Read The Book:

July 2017

My Star Rating:

4 Stars

Chronology:

Standalone

Official Summary:

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.” So begins Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s witty comedy of manners—one of the most popular novels of all time—that features splendidly civilized sparring between the proud Mr. Darcy and the prejudiced Elizabeth Bennet as they play out their spirited courtship in a series of eighteenth-century drawing-room intrigues. Renowned literary critic and historian George Saintsbury in 1894 declared it the “most perfect, the most characteristic, the most eminently quintessential of its author’s works,” and Eudora Welty in the twentieth century described it as “irresistible and as nearly flawless as any fiction could be.”

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

Pride And Prejudice Book Tag

This was one of my AP Lit summer reading books, though I would have read it at some point even if it weren’t required because I’ve read and loved so many retellings I felt I had to read the original at some point. I did feel knowing the story lessened my enjoyment at some points, because certain sections drag out in descriptions that sort of make my eyes glaze over, but I did truly enjoy it for most of the book. I prefer Emma though.


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Original Release Date:

Published May 22nd 2007 by Riverhead

Date I Read The Book:

July 2017

My Star Rating:

4 Stars

Chronology:

Standalone

Official Summary:

At once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love.

Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love.

Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them – in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul – they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation. With heart-wrenching power and suspense, Hosseini shows how a woman’s love for her family can move her to shocking and heroic acts of self-sacrifice, and that in the end it is love, or even the memory of love, that is often the key to survival.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

This was one of our summer reading books for AP Lit this past year. Its well written, with amazingly real characters. I think its historically accurate, but I’m can’t be entirely certain. I am going to say its horribly depressing and I couldn’t really handle reading it for extended periods. If you like to cry when you read, you’ll enjoy this immensely.


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Original Release Date:

1886

Date I Read The Book:

November 2017

My Star Rating:

3 Stars

Chronology:

Novella

Official Summary:

Hailed as one of the world’s supreme masterpieces on the subject of death and dying, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the story of a worldly careerist, a high court judge who has never given the inevitability of his dying so much as a passing thought. But one day, death announces itself to him, and to his shocked surprise, he is brought face to face with his own mortality.

How, Tolstoy asks, does an unreflective man confront his one and only moment of truth?

This short novel was an artistic culmination of a profound spiritual crisis in Tolstoy’s life, a nine-year period following the publication of Anna Karenina during which he wrote not a word of fiction.
A thoroughly absorbing and, at times, terrifying glimpse into the abyss of death, it is also a strong testament to the possibility of finding spiritual salvation.

My Review: (Vague Spoilers)

I only just recently finished reading this in class for AP Lit. Maybe I’m a little traumatized because we had to write a three grade essay and stuff, but I didn’t like this very much. It was okay, I didn’t mind reading it, I just didn’t particularly want to. Its entirely about death and despair, and in my constant state of anxiety of college right now, I was not in a state where I could enjoy this. I can see why others might though, and I know its of great literary significance.

Throwback Thursday: Bioethics Debate -Insurance Companies Should Not Have The Right To Request Or Receive Genetic Test Results   

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.


(Co-authored with my friend Emilie C.)

Genetic tests are a fairly recent development in the medical, and sadly, despite the phenomenal advancements made each year on the science side of things, the legal side is lacking in keeping pace. For one thing, there are relatively few laws that protect genetic information, and according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, only one state of our 50 even considers genetic information to be personal property, this among other things need to be rectified, preferably before a crisis due to the abuse of genetic information.

Insurance companies are some of the most likely to abuse genetic information. Knowledge is power after all, and insurance companies have a vested interest not in patients, but in turning a profit. While the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) passed in 2008 makes it illegal for health insurers and employers to discriminate based on DNA, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute, there is a loophole: the law does not apply to long-term care insurance, disability insurance, or life insurance. In fact, any type of insurance company aside from health care can demand genetic test results before offering coverage. The patients most in need of these insurances are those at risk for genetic diseases such as Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s, yet, these are the people who find it most difficult to get coverage.

Many people avoid getting genetic tests, even when they have a high risk of inheriting a disorder, and when early diagnoses may lead to better care, because they fear what the insurance companies will do. For instance, because of genetic predispositions, or a family history of a genetic disease that may lead to an early death, a life insurance company can deny coverage. A person’s health care insurance may not be (legally) affected by a company receiving test results, but a patient’s health is still adversely affected. In an ethical dilemma such as this one, a patient’s right health, safety, and peace of mind, are far more important than a company’s right to turn a profit.

The other big ethical issue with insurance companies receiving genetic test results is privacy. The fourth amendment protects us from having to share or give away our personal property, and what is more personal than our genetic code? Aside from an infringement of personal rights, it is an infringement on patient rights, such as patient confidentiality, which is one of the pillars of ethics in medicine. One of the most famous violation of patient confidentiality is the case of Henrietta Lacks, whose cells were used for scientific research without her knowledge, who never received compensation despite our cells being some of the most valuable in science today (Rabin Martin, 2013). As are abilities expand, as technology improves, we may face more and more cases like this, some with far worse consequences than that of Henrietta Lacks. It is better to start focusing on how to prevent it as much possible now, than to deal with the fallout later.

By allowing insurance companies to receive genetic results, you violate privacy as well as a long-standing focal point of ethics in medicine. For no reason other than that insurance companies want to us that information to make money. Some companies will claim that they will not use the information against you, but if they aren’t going to use it, then why not eliminate the risk and just deny them access to the information in the first place.

On the topic of using genetic test results against a patient, we are brought to discrimination. Knowledge is power, and those in power always seek to use it, and often, they abuse it. Insurance companies use genetic information to raise rates and deny coverage to individuals who need it. This is a basic definition of discrimination. Even worse, it is discrimination for something as invisible as your DNA. Something you cannot control anymore than you could control your skin color (which is also based in your genes, so I guess genetic discrimination is nothing new). But these days, we don’t allow business to refuse someone based on skin color, that sort of discrimination is illegal. So why is it okay to discriminate based on genes? Something that no one has any control over.

In short, insurance companies shouldn’t have the right to request or receive genetic test results, either from clients or from family members. That way lies violation of privacy and discrimination. We can’t stop the abuse of genetic information unless we control the access of it. We don’t have the proper laws in place to protect us; the legal system cannot keep up with biotechnological advancements. But we can start with this. Chose patient rights over a company’s monetary gain. Make the right choice.

One Lovely Blog Award #2

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I was tagged by quite a few lovely bloggers:

Melting Pots and Other Calamities –  who has a really lovely blog, and is always super great.

Amanda @ Literary Weapon–  whose blog I haven’t been reading long, but is pretty amazing.

The Orangutan Librarian–  who I’ve been following for a while now, and never fails to make me long with her great reviews and discussions.

Anna from Its My Birth Write–  whose blog I also haven’t been reading long, but is epic as well.

Thank you so much to all of you for nominating me!

Sorry it took forever.

You can see my first award here: One Lovely Blog Award

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The Rules:

  • Thank the person that nominated you and leave a link to their blog.
  • Post about the award.
  • Share seven facts about yourself.
  • Nominate other people. (15 at most)
  • Tell your nominees the good news.

Facts:

1 – I’m in my senior year of high school, and I’m taking 5 AP classes plus 1 period of office aid.

2 – I’m applying to about 13 colleges.

3 – I’m considering adding a tutoring/proofreading service to my blog. Would anyone be interested?

4 – I may or may not dye my hair again at the end of the school year (I’m thinking red, and chopping it short so I don’t have to fight with the straightner as much).

5 – I plan to major in Neuroscience, on a pre-med track. I want to be a pediatric neurologist.

6 – I really really need a new bookshelf. Mine may collapse (again) if I force more books into it). Its also lined with pop figures.

7 – My Senior Yearbook quote is: “You go to college, I’m only child now” – Alexa B. (AKA my little sister).


Nominations:

Niraja @ Fantastic Books and Where to Find Them

Stephanie @ Adventures of a Bibliophile

Louise @ Genie Reads

Casey @ Adopt-a-Book-AUS

B @ Icebreaker694

Calliope The Book Goddess

Raquel @ Rakiodd Books

Megan @ Bookslayer Reads

Kayla @ KDrew The Bookworm

Lashaan and Trang @ Bookidote

Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek

Sophie @ Blame it on Chocolate

Alex @ Lord of the Trekkies

Angelina and Brianna @ Fables Library

Emma @ Corn Reviews Books

Throwback Thursday: Symbolic Recipe

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.


 

How to Make Sam Soup*

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons: Anxiety

1/2 cup: (What my mother calls) Teen Angst

1 1/4 cups: Clumsiness

3 tablespoons: Babbling

2 cups: Sarcasm (can also substitute backtalk)

1/4 cup: Wit (can also substitute intelligence)

1/2 teaspoon: Manners

1/4 teaspoon: Morals

1.5 ounces: Quick-temper

4 teaspoons: Competitiveness

Instructions:

  1. Combine all ingredients.
  1. Let cook for nine months, give or take a few weeks.
  1. Garnish with black eyeliner.
  2. Optional: Let sit before serving, the teen angst must boil out before it is fit to be part of society.

*WARNING: Will probably be sentient.

Throwback Thursday: Stages of Man Essay – 2014

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.


 

“All the world’s a stage”, this is the opening of the monologue by Jacques in Shakespeare’s As You Like It detailing the seven stages of man. Shakespeare’s seven stages covers the physical aspects of aging, from infancy to the oblivion of death. On the other hand, psychologist Erik Erikson’s eight stages covers the mental progression of age. An argument could be made for any of the stages, mental, physical, or both being the most difficult to live through. In my opinion, the stage of adolescence in Erikson’s stages of psychological development is the most difficult.

Adolescence is the fourth of the mental stages, and if matched to one of Shakespeare’s stages, would be found somewhere between the schoolboy (2) and the lover (3). This is because adolescence is a cross between childhood and adulthood. Adolescence is defined as being the ages between 13-19, also called the teenage years. I believe this is the hardest stage because of the afore mentioned fact that it is the stage in which the transition from child to adult takes place. At this stage, you are expected to act like an adult, but you are treated like a child. You are expected to make decisions that affect your entire future, but you cannot leave your home without your parent’s permission. At this stage, you can clearly remember the hardships of the stages that came before, and are intelligent enough to understand the hardships of the stages ahead. So, at this stage, you must deal with not only the hardship of the present, but you must also think about, and in most cases fret over, the responsibilities and hardships of future stages such as love, a career, and making both your parents and yourself proud.

The existential question attributed to adolescence by Erikson is “Who am I and what can I be?” This I think summarizing teenagers even today in a nutshell, and is why being a teenager is one of the toughest times in someone’s life, perhaps even the most difficult. Because aside from the expectation from parents to succeed in school, and all of societies expectations, teens need to try to stay true to who they are. All the while not knowing who that is. This is the age where you start trying to figure out what you like because the is the last time in your life where your parents are going to by your side, either to support you or to breathe down your neck. This is the time of your life where your real friendships start forming, and when you decide on your future. This is when you start dating. And it’s all the more difficult because the difference between this stage and the ones that comes before and after is so huge. The stage before is full of children, and the difference is very noticeable in interests, attitude, and looks. The stage after and those there after are full of full-fledged adults who have perhaps forgotten what it is to be in high school. The teenage years are when your self-confidence is at it’s lowest, so ridicule and peer-pressure are a large influence. Teens want to find out who they are, without differentiating themselves too much from their friends. All while being expected to prepare for adulthood.

In summary, my opinion on the most difficult stage of life is Erikson’s 4th stage of adolescence. This stage is equivalent to a mix of Shakespeare’s stages of schoolboy and lover, as it has attributes of each. I think it is the most difficult stage because it is the stage that marks the transition from child- to adulthood. Teenagers need to figure out who they are, while they crave to be accepted by society and meet their parents expectations. They are treated like children, just are expected to act like adults. This makes for a very difficult period. As Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage”, and at this stage is when a person does the most acting as someone they aren’t. Adolescence is when you change your role.

Throwback Thursday: That’s Not How Science Works: Vaccination Edition –

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.


 

Childhood vaccinations have been preventing disease and saving lives of children for over a century. Yet only in recent decades has vaccination become a question, a choice, rather than a must. The root of the vaccine debate lies in the question of personal freedom versus the effect on those around us of not vaccinating. Parents should have to vaccinate their children, because the benefits of doing so far outweigh any potential risks. Many of these perceived risks are fictional, so the fear they cause is unfounded.

Orange-County, California has one of the highest personal exemptions rates in the country, at nearly 9% of kids being unvaccinated. This county has also had the most deaths from the measles outbreak that originated in Disneyland. “Rhett Krawitt is in remission…vulnerable to infection and unable to be vaccinated, turning him into an unwitting symbol of the need for herd immunity” (Schulten, New York Times). Rhett is just one example. Herd immunity is if 95% of a population is vaccinated or otherwise immune. The remaining 5%, those with immune disorders or other conditions making them unable to be vaccinated, will be protected because the disease will not be able to develop. When immunization rates drop too low, diseases can sneak in and cause an epidemic like the one seen with the measles. One reason people don’t vaccinate is because they think the disease is nearly eradicated already and there is no need; however, that only stands true when we vaccinate.

One of the greatest misconceptions about vaccines that lead to personal exemptions is the false notion that “vaccines cause autism”. To be clear, they don’t. The rumor that they do was based upon falsified research that has since been retracted and disproven. The side effects of vaccines are almost always mild, ranging from a fever to a rash, only in rare cases. Only the DTaP vaccine has a more common, severe side effect. One in a million cases can suffer paralysis or brain damage (CDC website). Even so, the risk you run in not getting the vaccine, which is to protect infants from whooping cough, diphtheria, and tetanus, is far worse than these rare risks.

Many people choose not to vaccinate because it is their “personal freedom” or because they “don’t want to overburden their child’s immune system”; however, people should have to vaccinate their children because the risks posed to both individuals and society by not doing so far outweighs the rare case of adverse effects from vaccination. As Dr. Snyder said to the Boston Globe “It’s a common theme that we see parents questioning scientific facts in the same way they would debate a political topic.” We shouldn’t let them.

Throwback Thursday: Karyotype Letter – 2014

Throwback Thursday, where, essentially I post old writing samples, essays and short stories that I dig up from my pile of hoarded papers and school assignments or from the depths of my computer. So everyone can see how my writing has changed/improved over the years.

For this particular assignment, we drew chromosomes from a hat to write about the disorder a trisomy of that chromosome would cause.

I originally drew 21 but everyone else reveled, saying it was unfair since I wouldn’t have to research it (my sister has Down’s Syndrome – also known as trisomy 21) so I traded with my best friend for trisomy 15. All the science here is as accurate as a 14 year old could get.


 

Dear Soon-to-be Parents,

I have finished reviewing your child’s karyotype, and I regret to inform you that I found a genetic abnormality.  As you know all human beings have 46 chromosomes. In your son’s case he has 47 chromosomes, an extra chromosome, the 15th to be precise. This is also called trisomy 15. This additional chromosome can cause one of two genetic syndromes.  Trisomy 15 can cause either Prader-Willi’s syndrome (PWS) or Angelman’s Syndrome (AS). PWS occurs when the extra chromosome comes from the mother. AS occurs when the extra chromosome comes from the father. Unfortunately a karyotype does not tell us where the extra chromosome came from and thus I cannot tell you which disorder your son will be born with. Both syndromes also result in miscarriages, but at this stage in pregnancy that is highly unlikely.  As you are entering the third trimester, an abortion is also not a viable option so I would like to take this opportunity to provide some education and prognosis so you can help your son grow and develop to the best of his potential.

Some common symptoms to both disorders are: delayed growth and development, mental retardation, hypotonia (weak muscle tone), and characteristic facial features. The severance of these symptoms varies from child to child.. Chromosome 15 codes genetic information used largely by the brain, specifically in muscle movements, as well as, eye and skin color. The maternal chromosome is usually the most active, thus, with Angelman’s syndrome, the extra paternal chromosome manifests in certain symptoms. Angelman’s causes developmental delays, especially physically. Fine motor skills are underdeveloped and they have short attention spans. Those with Angelman’s frequently exhibit hypopigmentation, which causes their skin, eyes, and hair to be significantly lighter than the parents’.  Children with Angelman’s generally have poor verbal skills, though their non-verbal communication is generally better than their peers. They are described as “excessively happy and always smiling”. Children with Angelman’s can live independent, happy lives with the proper assistance and care. They live well into adulthood and can have children of their own, though it is hereditary.

As for Prader-Willi’s syndrome, an extra maternal copy is activated. Common symptoms include: extreme, insatiable appetite (polyphagia), delayed to no pubescent growth (hypogonadism), extremely weak muscles, and hormone imbalances. People with this condition typically find it hard to reproduce. They have distinct facial characteristics, including: thin upper lips, almond shaped eyes, lighter skin, and a downturned mouth. Joints are usually loosely extended and sex organs are slow in development. As with Angelman’s, children with Prader-Willi’s have trouble learning and speaking. Due to their insatiable hunger, they are prone to huger pains, and obesity. This can cause severe sleeping and behavioral problems. Nearly all with Prader-Willi’s live well into adulthood, but many rely on drug therapy to suppress the worst of the symptoms. Both disorders are linked to having a lower than average intelligence.

You may be wondering how this could have happened to your son, wondering how he ended up with three chromosome 15s instead of two. You may want to blame each other. Well don’t. It is just as likely to come from the father than the mother, and vise-versa. It isn’t either of your faults; it is a result of non-disjunction. Non-disjunction is, to put it simply, when in meiosis, the chromosomes that should separate, don’t. Usually, replicated chromosomes split, so each haploid cell/gamete has one copy. Non-disjunction can occur equally in males and females. When non-disjunction occurs, both copies of a chromosome enter one cell, and none enter the other. If this occurs in Meiosis I, then there is a 50% chance of a monosomy (having one copy of a chromosome) and 50% chance of a trisomy (having 3 copies, which is what happened to your son). If non-disjunction happens in meiosis II, then there is a 50% chance of a “normal” baby, 25% chance of monosomy, and 25% chance of trisomy. It is not your fault, and you are not the only parents to go through this, your son is not the only one with this disorder (which ever it may be). About 1 in 1000 pregnancies have chromosomal disorders. And while there isn’t a cure, there are ways to help your son.

Treatments for both Angelman’s and Prader-Willi’s are similar. One noticeable difference is that children with Prader-Willi’s require more hormone and drug treatments. Hormone treatments are used to help the child develop normally, and to trigger puberty if it does not occur naturally. Drug treatments are also used to treat the hunger pains. Many children follow special diets that are “low in calories but high in proteins, fiber, and various essential nutrients” so that they do not become obese. Other treatments for Prader-Willi’s are the same as those for Angelman’s; they focus mainly on making the symptoms caused by the disease manageable.

Early Intervention is the key to minimizing the effects and increasing your son’s chances of success.  Early Intervention programs provide children a mix of speech, occupational, and physical therapies, among other things. This starts in infancy and can help a child with these disorders to develop skills similar to their “normal” peers. This therapies can help a child with a developmental disability reach milestones sooner than they would on their own. Children who go through early intervention are more capable and show less extreme symptoms than those that don’t. Children with chromosomal disorders often require more specialized learning environments than public school can offer, there are special schools these children can attend to aid their education. Here in south Florida, schools such as “The Learning Experience” are specifically for taking care of those children with special needs. And while these schools can be expensive, scholarships and other programs are available such as the McKay Voucher here in Florida. Feel free to contact me, or any of my co-workers for additional information. And remember, your son is special. He’s going to need a little extra help, but he’ll love you the same as any other baby.

Best Wishes,
Dr. Samantha B. (Last name redacted)

 

AP Literature Reading Challenge – 2017/18 School Year

Hello!

If you’ve been reading my blog for, pretty much any length of time, you’ll know at least two things:

  1. I avoid and mostly dislike classics.
  2. I am taking AP English Lit this coming school year.

What does that mean? I have to read EVERY CLASSIC EVER IF I WANT TO PASS. (Not literally, it just feels that way)

So, to make the chore of “I must read this to not fail” (which tends to suck all the fun out), I’m making a reading challenge!

From September 1st 2017 (A week after school starts)  – May 1st 2018 (A week before the AP test), the goal is to read as many classics and AP Lit recommended books as possible.

I figure lots of others are in the same boat as me, and others still want to get more classics read. Everyone is welcome to join, just comment down below telling me you’re joining me, and if you make a TBR post (to keep us updated on your progress!) link that below as well!


For Some TBR Ideas:

AP Lit Course Description – Lists Recommended Authors

Prep Scholar Book List

Every Book On The Exam Since 1971

Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge


My TBR: (In No Particular Order)

The Great Gatsby

Hamlet

Frankenstein

1984

-Whatever else I decide, because I’m not great at sticking to TBRs made in advance.

-The books above are the specific classics my AP Lit teacher recommended we read.

Senior Year Book Tag (Original)

As you probably know, I start my senior year of high school now in August!
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And that means several things.
First, it means I have one more year before going to college.
Second, I will be spending the next three to four months in a haze of stress filling out college and scholarship applications.
Third, I will not only have less time to post, but be so monumentally terrified of posting because WHAT IF I SAY SOMETHING STUPID AND COLLEGES DECIDE THEY DON’T WANT ME. Because of this, I feel I must clarify that the above gif is a joke. I complain about school like every other teenager ever, but I quite like most classes and I like learning – please let me go to college.
Okay, back to the blog post.
In honor of this, I have made a “Senior Year Book Tag” to celebrate.

Rules:

– Link back to the creator (RiverMoose-Reads)
-Answer the questions
-Tag 5+ people, preferably seniors.

Almost Done – A series ending this year (or next)

The Queen Of Air And Darkness by Cassandra Clare comes out next May, the last of The Dark Artifices Trilogy. It comes out the month I graduate so that seems fitting!

Senioritis – A book that focuses on mental health

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Grades – A character who’d have a similar class schedule / grades as you.

Definitely Annabeth Chase – we’re both overachieving who take AP classes and MUST get those straight A’s.

Graduation – A character that has come a long way through a book or series

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Both Ollie and Mortiz learn and grow throughout this duology.

Cap and Grown – A character whose outfits you want

My style could probably be described as most akin to Cath from Fangirl – her wardrobe is probably full of nerdy stuff and I’d gladly take it.

College – A new adult read

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I Tag:

All incoming seniors who read this.